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Over Half Of US Kids On Track For Obesity By 35
 Miami (AFP) - More than 57 percent of children in the United States will be obese by age 35 if current trends in weight gain and poor eating...
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Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance In Brain
CHICAGO, Nov. 30, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to...
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Thoughts on Vegas and Why Men Keep Doing This
Note: This post by Charlie Hoehn has some great applications to what we do in student ministry and we wanted to make sure that you see it...
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Cheap Sex and the Decline of Marriage
Why is marriage in retreat among young Americans? Because it is now much easier for men to find sexual satisfaction outside marriage, argues Mark...
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How Teens Spend Their After-School Hours
 Smartphones are changing the way an entire generation spends their time. Teens (or iGen, as some have named them) have come of age in a world...
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News Archives

The Danger More Pressing than Sex and Drugs in Your Youth Group

Tuesday October 10th, 2017

 A new study of today’s teenagers contains both encouraging and troubling findings for parents, pastors, and youth group leaders concerned with reaching “Generation Z.”

 
According to the research, teenagers in the early 2010s tried alcohol later and had sex far less often compared with their predecessors: About 54 percent of high-school students in 1991 reported having had sex, while only 41 percent did in the early 2010s. For student pastors who have been fighting the war against partying, pregnancies and STDs, this is encouraging news; however, the results seem to come with a cost.
 
Swapping Risky Behavior for Different Risky Behavior
Generation Z students (those born between the early 1990s and mid-2000s) are less likely to drive, work for pay, go on dates, or socialize without their parents. While at home, students are largely glued to their smartphones. They are highly active on social media sites that create an illusion of community that research shows actually increases isolation.
 
In an essay for The Atlantic, Jean M. Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University and the author of Generation Me and iGen, warns about the effect smartphone obsession is having on teens: “the twin rise of the smartphone and social media has caused an earthquake of a magnitude we’ve not seen in a very long time, if ever."
 
 
 

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